Medicare experiment could signal sea change for hospice

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Diane Meier 176By Michelle Andrews
KHN / JUL 29, 2014

Diane Meier is the director of the Center to Advance Palliative Care, a national organization that aims to increase the number of palliative care programs in hospitals and elsewhere for patients with serious illnesses.

Meier is also a professor of geriatrics and palliative medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

We spoke about a recently launched pilot program under the health law that allows hospice patients participating in the pilot to continue to receive life-prolonging treatment. This is an edited version of that conversation.

Q. There’s a lot of confusion about how hospice care differs from palliative care. Maybe we should start by clearing up what those terms mean. Continue reading

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Health news headlines – July 29th

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Global health news – July 29th

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Good News for Boomers: Medicare’s Hospital Trust Fund flush until 2030

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Medicare’s Hospital Insurance Trust Fund, which finances about half the health program for seniors and the disabled, won’t run out of money until 2030, the program’s trustees said Monday.

That’s four years later than projected last year and 13 years later than projected the year before the passage of the Affordable Care Act. Continue reading

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Limits of new health plans rankle some enrollees

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Photo: Willi Heidelbach

This KHN story also ran in .

Nancy Pippenger and Marcia Perez live 2,000 miles apart but have the same complaint: Doctors who treated them last year won’t take their insurance now, even though they haven’t changed insurers.

“They said, ‘We take the old plan, but not the new one,’” says Perez, an attorney in Palo Alto, California.

In Washington state, administrative rules announced this spring require insurers to provide enough primary care doctors so enrollees can get an appointment within 10 days and 30 miles of their home or workplace.

In Plymouth, Indiana, Pippenger got similar news from her longtime orthopedic surgeon, so she shelled out $300 from her own pocket to see him.

Both women unwittingly bought policies with limited networks of doctors and hospitals that provide little or no payment for care outside those networks. Continue reading

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Global health news – July 28th

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New hepatitis C treatments – FDA Consumer Update

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fda-logo-thumbnailFrom the US Food and Drug Administration

At the approval of several new drugs for hepatitis C is  welcome news for baby boomers—who make up three of four adults with the hepatitis C virus—and millions of other Americans, many of whom don’t yet know they are infected and carriers, says the US Food and Drug Administration in this Consumer Update.

Hepatitis C can be cured, and today’s drug therapies are very effective and easier for patients to take, says Jeffrey S. Murray, M.D., the deputy director of the Division of Antiviral Products in FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. Murray is an internist who specializes in infectious diseases.

A Preventable and Curable Disease

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Health news headlines – July 28th

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Global health news – July 27th

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Women’s health – Week 47: Alcohol

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tacuin womenFrom the Office of Research on Women’s Health

Even in small amounts, alcohol can have negative effects on a woman’s health. In some ways, heavy drinking is a lot more risky for women than it is for men.

Women who drink more than one drink per day increase their risk for motor vehicle crashes, other injuries, high blood pressure, stroke, violence, suicide, and certain types of cancer. Continue reading

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Top five stories of the week

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Credit: Dan Shirly

Credit: Dan Shirly

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Health news headlines – July 26th

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Global health news – July 26th

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Automatically renewing your Obamacare policy could cost you thousands

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Twenty-dollar bill in a pill bottleBy Michael Ollove
Stateline

For the 8 million people who persevered through all the software trapdoors in the new health insurance exchanges and managed to sign up for coverage in 2014, their policies will probably automatically renew come November when open enrollment begins.

Seems like good news after all the headaches consumers endured after the program’s launch last year.

Except that renewing the same policy may not be the best choice. Many may end up paying far more than they need to and with policies that don’t best fit their individual circumstances.

“(Automatic re-enrollment) could conceivably mean people will pay more in premiums unless they proactively take steps to comparison shop.”

“(Automatic re-enrollment) could conceivably mean people will pay more in premiums unless they proactively take steps to comparison shop,” said Jenna Stento, a senior manager at Avalere Health, a health care research and consulting firm.

If you made a good choice last year, what could be so wrong about re-upping with the same plan? Continue reading

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